Student Assessment

MASSACHUSETTS COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT SYSTEM (MCAS)

The Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) is designed to meet the requirements of the Education Reform Law of 1993. This law specifies that the testing program must
test all public school students in Massachusetts, including students with disabilities and English Language Learner students;
measure performance based on the Massachusetts Curriculum Framework learning standards;
report on the performance of individual students, schools, and districts.
As required by the Education Reform Law, students must pass the grade 10 tests in English Language Arts (ELA), Mathematics and one of the four high school Science and Technology Engineering tests as one condition of eligibility for a high school diploma (in addition to fulfilling local requirements).
In addition, the MCAS program is used to hold schools and districts accountable, on a yearly basis, for the progress they have made toward the objective of the No Child Left Behind Law that all students be proficient in Reading and Mathematics by 2014.

MCAS Question of the Day:  http://www.doe.mass.edu/mcas/


ASSESSING COMPREHENSION AND COMMUNICATION IN ENGLISH STATE-TO-STATE FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS (ACCESS for ELLs)

Federal and state laws require that English language learner (ELL) students be assessed annually to measure their proficiency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking English, as well as the progress they are making in learning English. In fulfillment of these laws, ELL students are required to participate in ACCESS for ELLs tests, which replace MEPA tests, beginning in the 2012-2013 school year.


PRELIMINARY SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TEST AND NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIP QUALIFYING TEST (PSAT/NMSQT)

The PSAT/NMSQT helps students become college ready. It provides detailed feedback on skills, access to scholarships and personalized online tools, and excellent practice for the SAT. The PSAT/NMSQT assesses the critical reading, mathematics, and writing skills students need for college and beyond. Find out what the test is like and try practice questions. Over 3.6 million students take the PSAT/NMSQT each year. Only 11th-grade students can qualify for scholarships and recognition, but younger students benefit from early feedback on their skills.

PSAT Practice: https://www.collegeboard.org/psat-nmsqt/preparation/practice-for-the-test


 

SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TEST (SAT)

The SAT and SAT Subject Tests are designed to assess your academic readiness for college. These exams provide a path to opportunities, financial support, and scholarships, in a way that’s fair to all students. The SAT and SAT Subject Tests keep pace with what colleges are looking for today, measuring the skills required for success in the 21st century.

CollegeBoard + KhanAcademy Official SAT Practice: https://www.khanacademy.org/sat

SAT Practice Questions: https://sat.collegeboard.org/practice/sat-practice-questions

Full SAT Practice Test: https://sat.collegeboard.org/practice/sat-practice-test

Question of the Day: https://sat.collegeboard.org/practice/sat-question-of-the-day

Test Day Checklist: https://sat.collegeboard.org/register/sat-test-day-checklist

SAT Study Plan: https://sat.collegeboard.org/practice/sat-study-plan

Test Day Simulator: https://sat.collegeboard.org/register/sat-test-day-tips


The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)

NAEP provides a common measure of student achievement across the country. Because states have their own unique assessments with different content and standards, it is impossible to use them as a means for comparing state achievement. Such comparisons are possible with NAEP, however, because the questions and administration of the assessment are the same across all states.


 

AMERICAN COLLEGE TESTING (ACT)

The ACT is a national college admissions examination that consists of subject area tests in English, Mathematics, Reading and Science The ACT Plus Writing includes the four subject area tests plus a 30-minute writing test. ACT results are accepted by all four-year colleges and universities in the US. The ACT includes 215 multiple-choice questions and takes approximately 3 hours and 30 minutes to complete, including a short break (or just over four hours if you are taking the ACT Plus Writing). Actual testing time is 2 hours and 55 minutes (plus 30 minutes if you are taking the ACT Plus Writing).

ACT Test Prep: http://www.actstudent.org/testprep/

http://www.act.org/explorestudent//